Ecological Adaptations of the Kola Peninsula Neolithic People: Postcranial Morphology and Paleopathology


 

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: Ecological Adaptations of the Kola Peninsula Neolithic People: Postcranial Morphology and Paleopathology
: C.. , ..
: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY
: 2015
: 20
: PDF
: 2 Mb
:
. The burial ground on Bolshoy Oleniy Ostrov (literally meaning Big Deer Island) in the Kola bay of the Barents Sea, was discovered in 1925. This Neolithic burial ground is the only one currently known in the coastal Arctic region and is one of the most ancient of such sites. Considering the dearth of skeletal data for the region, the skeletal series recovered from this site provided a unique opportunity for comparative analysis.
The aim of this study was to compare skeletal morphological adaptations to polar conditions among people who lived in the area of Kola Bay 3500 years ago, with those of a more recent population of Sami, who lived on the northern shore of the Kola Peninsula at the turn of the 20
th century. We also used some data from previously published circumpolar skeletal series for comparisons of several skeletal parameters.
: paleopathology, caries, enamel hypoplasia, cold stress 





: , 15 2017
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